Repost : 5 Tips for Using LinkedIn to Find a Job

Can networking help you find job leads, potential customers, and business contacts? The answer is an unequivocal yes. Because networking is so important in establishing relationships, regardless of the industry, it becomes even more paramount for the job seeker to use internet networking to the fullest. The best professional internet network out there is called, LinkedIn. If you are looking for a job and you’re not already on this network, I would encourage you to join it http://www.linkedin.com/. It’s free, easy to use, and provides excellent access to people who can help you. But, there is a catch. If you join LinkedIn thinking you’ll treat it like Facebook, be prepared to be disappointed. They’re not the same. LinkedIn is less social and more about business. You have to actually work to gain access to the people who you don’t already know. Here are a few tips to help you use LinkedIn to garner more job opportunities.

• Resist the desire to collect names. Anyone can build a storehouse of people they’re connected to, but if you don’t interact with these connections then you’re wasting your time. Less is best if you want to sniff out every lead you possibly can.

• If you graduated from college, see if your university has formed a LinkedIn group and join the group. Here is where people will list the positions they are looking to fill, and also, candidates will post their availability for hire.

• Join as many groups suited to your field of experience and interest as you can. Once you join these groups, make sure that you interact with other members and let the world know that you’re available for employment opportunities.

• Create a target list of people you’d like to get to know based on the companies you’re interested in working for. The more you interact with people from those companies, the more you can learn about the organization’s hiring practices.

• When you send an invitation to connect with someone, make sure to add a personal note so that they know a little about you and why you’re contacting them.

Beware of what you post on all social networks. Once it’s out there, it will remain there permanently for good and bad. If you trash your employer on Facebook for example, it is possible that your comments could be read by the wrong person. Employers are using Google as part of their background searches, so make sure that what you say and do in cyberspace always represents you well.

Once you’re on LinkedIn, put your public profile link on your resume. Doing this provides more opportunities for potential employers to check you out, and it shows that you know how to market yourself which is extremely helpful when you’re trying to standout.

If you have had success using social networking for business leads, please tell us how you did it. Good news fuels creativity and the courage to think multi-directionally or sideways as I like to say.

 

 

Related Posts:

Resume Writing Tips

 

 

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Reentering the Workforce

This has been an incredibly busy time for me. After a five-year sabbatical, to research and write my novel, I have reentered the workforce. As of this week I am now new Director of Operations at The Mahone Group. It has only been a few days, but already I’m absolutely thrilled to have found a new home with this staffing company, and I’m enjoying getting into the swing of things as I get acclimated to the company and the Atlanta market.

Since many of you reading this blog are looking for new employment opportunities, or you know someone who is looking for a new opportunity, I thought I’d share a few tips to help you make the best possible impression when interviewing and or starting a new job.

Dress to Impress

• Yes it’s summer and yes it’s hot, but a nice business suit is still the best choice of clothing when interviewing or starting a new job. As a rule, it is better to be overdressed than underdressed when you meet a potential employer or when you start a new job.

• I love sandals and would live in open-toed shoes if the option existed, but some business environments frown on sandals while others are fine with casual attire. Unless specified by your new boss, it is best to error on the side of caution. Keep all of your little piggies in a professional closed-toe shoe until you know what is considered appropriate clothing in your new work environment. Needless to say, this same rule applies to interviewing.

• Avoid low-cut tops and dresses.

• Wear panty hose, knee-high’s, or trouser socks rather than going commando and showing off your bare legs.

• Since many people are allergic to certain fragrances, don’t wear perfume, body spray, or scented lotion until you land the job and determine what is appropriate for your new work environment.

Come Prepared

• Arrive 10-15 minutes early when starting a new job or interviewing for a job. Sometimes traffic is unpredictable and the last thing you want to do is show up late on your first day or when meeting a potential employer.

• Bring two extra copies of your resume with you when you interview for a job. Also, make sure the extra copy you bring is the same version as the one you sent to the potential employer.

• Bring your list of references with you to the interview.

• Freshen your breath by eating a breath mint right before you sit down with your interviewer or new boss.

With the job market being as tight as it is, you want to give an employer every possible reason to hire you or to keep you on board if you already have the job. Take a few moments to prepare before your interview and get plenty of rest so that you’re able to bring your A game. For job seekers in the Atlanta, Georgia area, feel free to visit The Mahone Group’s website and submit an application online, we’d love to hear from you.

 

 

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Resume Writing Tips

Resume Tips

 

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Job Searching Using LinkedIn

Can networking help you find job leads, potential customers, and business contacts? The answer is an unequivocal yes. Because networking is so important in establishing relationships, regardless of the industry, it becomes even more important for the job seeker to use internet networking to the fullest. The best professional internet network out there is called, LinkedIn. If you are looking for a job and you’re not already on this network, I would encourage you to join it.  It’s free, easy to use, and provides excellent access to people who can help you. But, there is a catch. If you join LinkedIn thinking you’ll treat it like Facebook, be prepared to be disappointed. They’re not the same.  LinkedIn is less social and more about business. You have to actually work to gain access to the people who you don’t already know. Here are a few tips to help you use LinkedIn to garner more job opportunities.

 

  • Resist the desire to collect names. Anyone can build a storehouse of people they’re connected to, but if you don’t interact with these connections then you’re wasting your time. Less is best if you want to sniff out every lead you possibly can.
  • If you graduated from college, see if your university has formed a LinkedIn group and join the group. Here is where people will list the positions they are looking to fill, and also, candidates will post their availability for hire.
  • Join as many groups suited to your field of experience and interest as you can. Once you join these groups, make sure that you interact with other members and let the world know that you’re available for employment opportunities.
  • Create a target list of people you’d like to get to know based on the companies you’re interested in working for. The more you interact with people from those companies, the more you can learn about the organization’s hiring practices.
  • When you send an invitation to connect with someone, make sure to add a personal note so that they know a little about you and why you’re contacting them.

 Beware of what you post on all social networks. Once it’s out there, it will remain there permanently for good and bad. If you trash your employer on Facebook for example, it is possible that your comments could be read by the wrong person. Employers are using Google as part of their background searches, so make sure that what you say and do in cyberspace always represents you well. 

 Once you’re on LinkedIn, put your public profile link on your resume. Doing this provides more opportunities for potential employers to check you out, and it shows that you know how to market yourself which is extremely helpful when you’re trying to standout. 

 If you have had success using social networking for business leads, please tell us how you did it. Good news fuels creativity and the courage to think multi-directionally or sideways as I like to say. 

  

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Related Posts:

5 Resume Tips and Advice

More How-To’s For Writing A Good Resume

 

We Have A Winner

Make that two winners! Yes, ladies and gentleman, we have two people who correctly identified two of the Seinfeld characters. The winners are voice artist, Susan Wade, and Christian writer, Susan Reinhardt (http://www.susanjreinhardt.blogspot.com/). Well done ladies! Bravo!!!

Resume Writing Tips

I’ve read thousands of resumes over the years and I’d have to say that there is one common weakness that I see repeatedly. Most people tend to list their job responsibilities (i.e. I did this, I did that, responsible for this, responsible for that), but most gloss over or ignore listing their accomplishments in those respective job functions. I have to tell you, employers are more attracted to candidates that can show a track record of success. Like it or not, a correlation will be made between what you’ve done in the past, and what you’re capable of doing in the future. If your past, as you’ve represented it on your resume, is nondescript, then how can an employer get a sense of who you are and what you bring to the table? 

So, now that you know you need to include accomplishments, let’s brainstorm ways of coming up with them.  

  • Try writing random memories as they pop into your mind where you did something for your boss/company and it helped him or her. List small things (i.e. I came in on a Saturday and put the finishing touches on a presentation), and bigger things (my team landed the XYZ account which led to $5 Million in revenue). Let your mind run free and jot down whatever you recall. Here are a few questions to help you get started.
  • Did you or your team ever complete a project ahead of schedule?
  • Did you make a suggestion that was implemented successfully and helped some component within the company?
  • Did you write or create printed materials that received compliments or praise by your boss or customers?
  • Did you train someone or a group of people who went on to do great things for the company?
  • Did you provide “an assist” to a co-worker that helped the company in some way?
  • Ask a trusted co-worker to recall moments when they noticed your accomplishments.
  • Pull out any and all certificates, recognition awards, commendations, and complimentary emails and letters (always keep these kinds of things), and write down the events that led to you receiving them.

Hopefully, you now have a good starting place for reworking accomplishments into your resume. Keep in mind that employers want to see how your individual contributions positively impacted the companies you’ve worked for. If you can demonstrate this effectively, you’ve just given yourself a tremendous leg up. If you have questions, send them to me privately by using the contact me form. 

Now for the contest!!! The first person to leave a comment with the correct name of one of the characters from this comedian’s popular TV show will win a free resume critique.

 

 

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Related Posts

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5 Tips for Using LinkedIn to Find a Job 

 

 

Resume Tips

I know I’m switching gears here, but with so many of my friends either out of work or anticipating being out of work, I thought I’d offer straight-shooting resume writing tips. The key is that you understand why I’m an expert on the subject. Prior to becoming a writer, I spent over 13 years working in the staffing industry. I started out as a technical recruiter, progressed into HR management, and worked up to chief operating officer. If there’s one thing I know well, it’s how to evaluate a resume.

 Many people, with sincere intentions, present resumes that flat out represent them poorly.  Someone looking for a job stands a better chance of winning the lottery then having an employer tell them the truth of why they weren’t selected. And to be honest, it’s not the employer’s fault. They aren’t paid to provide you with resume or interviewing advice, their only purpose in talking to you is to determine if you would be an asset to their company.

 So, with this reality in mind, let’s start with the basics and work from there. 

 

  • ALWAYS, ALWAYS, ALWAYS include your legal name at the top of your resume followed by your full address, and phone number. If you have a cell phone and a landline, list both numbers and make it easier for a potential employer to contact you.
  • Get a professional email address if you don’t have one already. Your best bet is to stick with some version of your name and incorporate numbers if necessary.  You’d be amazed at how many people list their email address as something like – fingerlickinggood@hotmail.com or doglovermark@aol.com
  • Make sure that your voicemail greeting and answering machine greeting are professional and inviting to an employer calling you. Avoid greetings like: “this is Mike, Katie, Adam, Sue, Larry, Chip, Dominick and Amy; we’re not here right now…” Or musical intro’s, prayer/scripture intro’s (unless you’re applying for a ministry or church related position etc.)
  • If you have 10+ years of experience, for goodness sake, don’t cram all of it on one page. Two pages are perfectly acceptable.
  • Skip the objective. The employer already knows your objective – you want a job. Write a paragraph summary that highlights the sum of your experience and sells your background.

We’ll continue to cover this throughout the week. Please feel free to ask questions using the contact form. I’d be delighted to offer whatever help I can. Also, swing by on Thursday for the contest. The winner will receive a free resume critique.

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